The PlayFinder™

Type of Play
Genre

MenWomenTotal Cast

Subgenre Filter(s)

Satchmo at the Waldorf - ePublication

$8.00
Qty:
Terry Teachout
Full Length, Comedy/Drama
1 man (doubling)
Total Cast: 1, Flexible Set
ISBN: 978-0-8222-3158-5

FORMAT:

DPS ePlays are intended for reading on your computer, tablet or mobile device and cannot be printed.

This ePlay is available in the ePub format. ePlays may be transferred to supported eReader devices, including the B&N Nook, Sony Reader, Kobo eReader, and many others. ePlays are also compatible with Android tablets and smartphones, the iPad, iPhone, and other mobile devices through the use of free eReader apps. ePlays are not compatible with the Amazon Kindle. Please note that ePlays are intended for reading onscreen and may not be printed. Before purchasing an ePlay, review our ePlays page for more information.

ePlays are available for purchase with a credit card only. Adding an ePlay to your shopping cart will require that all items in your cart be purchased by credit card. For this reason items that you wish to order on account or by PO must be ordered separately from ePlays.
FEE: $100 per performance. SPECIAL NOTE ON SONGS: The songs "Lazy River" and “West End Blues” are required for production; an additional fee of $50.00 per nonprofessional performance will be added.

THE STORY: SATCHMO AT THE WALDORF is a one-man, three-character play in which the same actor portrays Louis Armstrong, the greatest of all jazz trumpeters; Joe Glaser, his white manager; and Miles Davis, who admired Armstrong's playing but disliked his onstage manner. It takes place in 1971 in a dressing room backstage at the Empire Room of New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, where Armstrong performed in public for the last time four months before his death. Reminiscing into a tape recorder about his life and work, Armstrong seeks to come to terms with his longstanding relationship with Glaser, whom he once loved like a father but now believes to have betrayed him. In alternating scenes, Glaser defends his controversial decision to promote Armstrong's career (with the help of the Chicago mob) by encouraging him to simplify his musical style, while Davis attacks Armstrong for pandering to white audiences.
"By the show's end, you sense the profound fortitude that lay beneath the avuncular surface of this giant, and you are newly appreciative of his singular place in history." —The New York Times. "An extraordinarily rich and complex characterization." —The New Yorker. "A trenchant portrait of the artist." —New York Post. "A complex and finely shaded picture…of an artist coping with racism." —New York Daily News. "A deep, impassioned bio-play about a jazz legend…a work of insight and power." —Boston Globe.