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Shipwrecked! An Entertainment—The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (as Told by Himself) - ePublication

$8.00
Qty:
Donald Margulies
Author bio(s)
Full Length, Adventure
2 men, 1 woman (doubling)
Total Cast: 3, Flexible Set
ISBN: 978-0-8222-2779-3

FORMAT:

FEE: $100 per performance. SPECIAL NOTE: A CD containing the sound design and original music by John Gromada is available through the Play Service for $35.00, plus shipping and handling. The nonprofessional fee for the use of this music is $25.00 per performance.

THE STORY: The adventurous Louis de Rougemont invites you to hear his amazing story of bravery, survival and celebrity that left nineteenth-century England spellbound. Dare to be whisked away in a story of the high seas, populated by exotic islanders, flying wombats, giant sea turtles and a monstrous man-eating octopus. SHIPWRECKED examines how far we're willing to blur the line between fact and fiction in order to leave our mark on the world.
"Recreating the pleasures of nineteenth-century platform entertainment with a tart contemporary twist, Donald Margulies' SHIPWRECKED offers a self-promoting fabulist a forum to inform and persuade, and it delights in both respects." —Variety. "The Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright Donald Margulies scampers to the defense of good old-fashioned yarn spinning with SHIPWRECKED. The breathless story of a Victorian gentleman [and] seafaring wanderer springs to life like a theatrical pop-up book. The audience is left to judge whether he is an inspirational figure touched by imaginative genius or a mere con man. We can also consider the possibility that the hero of this true story based on an untrue story is a little of each." —NY Times. "Margulies gives a sympathetic nod to the audacious autobiographer's creative overreach in SHIPWRECKED, a deft literate narrative folded into a vaudevillian romp with radio theater overtones. Colorful [and] compassionate speculations on the real-life deficiencies and pain that may have been at the root of Louis' need for self-aggrandizement." —LA Times.